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  Updated Thu, 22 Feb 2018 16:00:35 +0000
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Unknown Pleasures #149 ft. Broads, Malena Zavala, Lydian Collective
Category Unknown Pleasures, A Small Selection of Lofty Ambitions, Abrogate electronica, Broads, jazz, Lydian Collective, Malena Zavala
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Gather round and hear a pick of the latest sounds currently gliding under the surface of the mainstream as Getintothis? Mike Stanton unravels another installment of Unknown Pleasures. Electronic duo Broads are from Norfolk (as the name suggests) and have just released their new album Field Theory to critical acclaim. James Ferguson and Mark Jennings [...]

The post Unknown Pleasures #149 ft. Broads, Malena Zavala, Lydian Collective appeared first on Getintothis.

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Broads (photo credit Matthew Tullett)

Broads (photo credit Matthew Tullett)

Gather round and hear a pick of the latest sounds currently gliding under the surface of the mainstream as Getintothis? Mike Stanton unravels another installment of Unknown Pleasures.

Electronic duo Broads are from Norfolk (as the name suggests) and have just released their new album Field Theory to critical acclaim. James Ferguson and Mark Jennings conjure the spirit of Plaid and Errors to create a record of deep textures and glacial atmospherics.

Their music delivers a wide range styles from synth-pop bliss to a hybrid fusion of genres encompassing ambient drone, post-rock and shoegaze. Broads takes a fascinating approach with this album, tastefully showcasing completely different sides of their musical spectrum.

Us & The Buzzing showcases an ability to combine complex percussive structures and intricate glitch synth patterns. The band’s now-signature sound, marrying droning, lo-fi synths and slow build through repetition with straightforward electronics is evident throughout Us & the Buzzing and ensures a mellow downtempo groove.

Broads have managed imbue their music with an emotional honesty that immediately draws you in, allowing the full-immersive ambience to drift you out on a cloud fuzzy electronics.

Field Theory is out now on Humm Recordings.

More sounds from the other side? Get onto our Unknown Pleasures archive here

Malena Zavala (photo credit Victoria Cranstoun & Malena Zavala)

Malena Zavala (photo credit Victoria Cranstoun & Malena Zavala)

Next is a slice of bittersweet dream pop from Argentina with Malena Zavala. Having worked with her brother in a band closely for five years before his relocation to California, Malena branched out on her own, fusing Latin rhythms with her dulcet vocals.

Taken from debut album Aliso, Could You Stay lilts with smooth melodies and an easy, laid-back pace that lulls the listener. There is something so incredible charming and endearing about Malena?s style that immediately draws you in. Intricate guitars, relaxed bass and layering of vocals ensures the easy pace is maintained.

Malena draws on wide range of influences for her songwriting, notably with themes of cultural identity, self-doubt, acceptance, artistic freedom, miscommunication between cultures, and relationships. It?s all set to a backdrop of fluid psych rock and dream pop that draws influence and inspiration from Beach House, Tame Impala and Devendra Banhart.

Aliso will be released digitally and 12? gatefold vinyl on the 13 April through Yucatan Records.

Lydian Collective (PR supplied publicity shot)

Lydian Collective (PR supplied publicity shot)

Something a little different for my third artist and it?s experimental ensemble Lydian Collective, who have been quietly gathering fans and appreciation since September 2017.

New track Cascades moves in a jazz direction, allowing the flexing of instrumental muscles and the exploration of the outer reaches of signature harmonies ? while the winning melodies of the first two singles re-appear.

Cascades was composed as a solo piano piece by Lydian Collective?s leader Aaron Wheeler, written on a stormy day with rain cascading from the roof of the studio. Having experimented with complex electronic sounds with the band, he wanted to go back to basics and compose something more simple and organic, making use of acoustic instrument sounds and textures. The inspiration from the jazz world is strong ? and makes for a fascinating journey, with twists and turns along the way.

Drawing inspiration from jazz, electronica, world music and movie soundtracks, Cascades is a smooth journey into the realm of lounge-core and it?s Wheeler?s piano lead backed by the killer rhythm team of Ida Hollis and Sophie Alloway, and Aaron?s co-composer, Todd Baker (keys & guitar) that gives the track its vibrancy.

Cascades is out now.

 

 

The post Unknown Pleasures #149 ft. Broads, Malena Zavala, Lydian Collective appeared first on Getintothis.

The Charlatans announce homecoming gigs and 10-day takeover
Category News, Average Sex, BMX Bandits, Charlatans, Clint Boon, Dave Haslam, DÉJÀ VEGA, Liverpool Sound City, Martin Blunt, Northwich, Riding The Low, The Blinders, Tim Burgess, Tom "Mouse" Smith, Yucatan
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The Charlatans have announced a 10-day takeover in their hometown of Northwich, during which they’ll play 4 nights at the Memorial Court, Getintothis’ Lewis Ridley looks forward to a festival which features an array of special guests. Northwich’s own The Charlatans are set to play 4 nights at the 650-capacity Northwich Memorial Court on Monday, May 14, Wednesday, May 16, Thursday, [...]

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The Charlatans

The Charlatans

The Charlatans have announced a 10-day takeover in their hometown of Northwich, during which they’ll play 4 nights at the Memorial Court, Getintothis’ Lewis Ridley looks forward to a festival which features an array of special guests.

Northwich’s own The Charlatans are set to play 4 nights at the 650-capacity Northwich Memorial Court on Monday, May 14, Wednesday, May 16, Thursday, May 17 and Friday, May 18.

The special fourfold of gigs will see the band play two almost completely different sets on the Thursday and Friday, with only Sproston Green, their traditional set-closer, repeated.

All ticketed events will go on sale on Saturday, March 3, through ticket platform Dice, which ensures that secondary ticketing sites can’t get their hands on any to skyrocket prices.

The gigs for part of a 10-day are festival in Northwich, which features an exhibition showing rare Charlatans memorabilia, a week of live bands at The Salty Dog pub, film screenings, podcasts and a vinyl adventures record fair.

Off The Record and The Charlatans take over the Northern Quarter – complete with a secret gig

The Charlatans Exhibition, shop and event space will be in a riverside unit in Barons Quay in Northwich and will run from Thursday, May 10 to Sunday, May 20 where you’ll be able to see merchandise from their 30-year career. What’s even better is that it’s free to enter and open until 8pm each night.

The Salty Dog pub, a pre-gig drinking spot for The Memorial Court is also running a week vibrant activity, including loads of gigs which will all finish before The Charlatans start across the road.

Deep Cuts favourites Deja Vega kick off the gigs on Monday, May 14, Chris Hawkins hosts a Charlatans pub quiz on Tuesday, May 15; Yucatanplay Wednesday, May 16; Average Sex, who supported the band on their recent tour, play on Thursday, May 16; BMX Bandits play on Friday, May 18.

Deja Vega

Deja Vega

On Saturday, May 19, there’s a gig from Riding The Low – the band fronted by British actor Paddy Considine. The takeover culminates in a gig from The Blinders on Sunday, May 20.

As part of the Get It Loud in Libraries series, there will also be a gig at Northwich Central Library. Slow Readers Club will play on on Saturday, May 19, supported by Tom Mouse Smith.

Retros Music Bar will host aftershow parties with DJ sets from Martin Blunt on Wednesday, May 16, Tim Burgess on Thursday, May 17 and Clint Boon on Friday, May 18.

It’s not just music, best selling author and Manchester icon Dave Haslam will be launching his autobiography, Sonic Youth Slept On My Floor, on the Saturday afternoon opposite the exhibition.

Northwich Odeon is holding special screenings on Saturday, May 19 where fans can catch Bunch of Kunst, the award-winning Sleaford Mods documentary, Factory Floor?s re-score of Fritz Lang?s Metropolis and Journeyman. Over the course of the day, these films will be intersected with rare Charlatans footage.

Of course, with Tim Burgess an avid lover of vinyl, a Vinyl Adventures Record Fair will take place in in The Plaza on Friday, May 18 from 4pm – 8pm and on Saturday, May 19 from 10pm – 6pm. It’s all free of charge and will features poets such as Tony Walsh and readings from Tim himself.

The Charlatans Northwich takeover

Finally, Liverpool Sound City will be bringing their Sound City Satellite to Northwich on Friday, May 18, with a conference in the afternoon and their choice of up and coming live acts in the evening. Tim was at last year’s festival where he was in conversation at his Tim Peaks stage and played an intimate acoustic set.

  • The Charlatans will take over Northwich between Thursday, May 10 and Sunday, May 20
  • They’ll play 4 gigs at Northwich Memorial Hall on May 14, 16, 17 and 18 with tickets on sale on Saturday, March 3 through Dice.

The post The Charlatans announce homecoming gigs and 10-day takeover appeared first on Getintothis.

Sort Rehearsal Rooms and Pirate Studios launch development programmes & Drenge kick off tour at IWF Liverpool
Category News, alex cameron, Bahamas, Bon Iver, Drenge, Gigs in Liverpool, Goat Girl, Hey Charlie, Howie Payne, Invisible Wind Factory, Liverpool gigs, Manchester gigs, northern quarter, Pheobe Bridgers, Pinkshinyultrablast, Sorry, Sort Touring, Sunflower Bean, Unsigned bands Liverpool, when in manchester
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This week sees two development programmes from Sort Rehearsal Rooms and Pirate Studios, here’s Getintothis‘ Lewis Ridley with the details. Sort Rehearsal Rooms have announced a development programme which will give unsigned acts the chance to write, rehearse, record and release music while being mentored by industry professionals every step of the way. Lee Mitchell, tour [...]

The post Sort Rehearsal Rooms and Pirate Studios launch development programmes & Drenge kick off tour at IWF Liverpool appeared first on Getintothis.

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Mike Halls of Clean Cut Kid is backing Sort's new initiative

Mike Halls of Clean Cut Kid is backing Sort’s new initiative

This week sees two development programmes from Sort Rehearsal Rooms and Pirate Studios, here’s Getintothis Lewis Ridley with the details.

Sort Rehearsal Rooms have announced a development programme which will give unsigned acts the chance to write, rehearse, record and release music while being mentored by industry professionals every step of the way.

Lee Mitchell, tour manager of the Baltic Triangle-based business said:Sort exists to help musicians further their careers so it was a natural next step to create a development program using the industry professionals we have in-house at Sort and the wider community.”

Sort are aiming to fuel the growth of local bands.

“We hope they’ll benefit from it to the point that they feel confident in moving forward in their careers. It can be tailored to the chosen band to strengthen any weaknesses they feel they have in certain areas and also further their strengths.”

To kick off the programme, Sort are offering one band a fully-funded Platinum Package which includes 16 hours of rehearsals at Sort Rehearsal Rooms and a songwriting workshop with a signed musician, such as Mike Halls of Clean Cut Kid.

Full details are here.

Hello Operator at Pirate Studios in Liverpool

Hello Operator at Pirate Studios in Liverpool

In more good news for grassroots development, Pirate Studios will help launch the careers of the three strongest emerging acts through their Pirate Prodigy Programme.

They’ll be teaming up with some of the most influential people in the music industry, including some of the names behind the likes of Liam Gallagher, Charli XCX and The Libertines.

Three emerging winners will receive the support of industry movers and shakers such as Liverpool Sound City COO Becky Ayres, David Bianchi and John Dawkins from Various Artists Management, Mikey Jonns from This Feeling.

More info here.

Sunflower Bean

Sunflower Bean

Drenge will entertain Liverpool’s Invisible Wind Factory as one of eight dates on their Grand Reopening Tour.

A Guardian new band of the day back in 2013, what seems like a lifetime ago, Drenge have since released two studio albums, albeit their latest almost three years ago.

Drenge

Drenge

When In Manchester will hold their 4th festival in the city’s Northern Quarter in GulliversThe CastleJimmy’s and The Peer Hat.

The event will feature The Big Peach, Hey CharlieCabezudos and more and will take place on Saturday, April 14.

Back in Liverpool, the closure of The Magnet means that many gigs have needed to switch venues for upcoming dates in the city. The new venues are now as follows, with all remaining tickets still valid:

Sunflower Bean and SorryInvisible Wind Factory, March 31.
Bahamas Leaf, April 5.
ShameDistrict, April 6.
Goat GirlThe Shipping Forecast, April 12.
Alex CameronArts Club, April 13.
PinkshinyultrablastThe Shipping Forecast, May 12.

Goat Girl

Goat Girl

Finally, Pheobe Bridgers will play Leaf on Tuesday, May 22 as part of a 4-date UK tour. She’ll play additional dates in support of Bon Iver before stopping off at the Bold St. venue.

Our new track this week comes from Howie Payne, the singer-songwriter played at Unity Theatre on Tuesday but last week released a California Mix of his track Evangeline (Los Angeles).

It’s a track that oozes US west coast sunshine, complete with signature harmonica, have a listen below:

The post Sort Rehearsal Rooms and Pirate Studios launch development programmes & Drenge kick off tour at IWF Liverpool appeared first on Getintothis.

FACT plans celebrations for its 15th birthday including special aftershow party
Category News, Aurora Halal, Binary, birthday, FACT, Graham Dunning, john mchugh, Liverpool, Malchance, mechanical techno, richard ramchurn, RLPO Mishima Quartet, Robin Fox, royal liverpool philharmonic, Smriti Keshari, the mirror, vicki bennet
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As FACT turns 15 years old Getintothis’ Banjo has the line up of its unique and stylish birthday celebrations, including exclusive details on a special aftershow party. FACT, Liverpool?s very own media arts centre, is due to turn 15 and, like any self-respecting 15 year old, it wants to have a birthday blow out. FACT?s [...]

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Aurora Halal live

Aurora Halal live

As FACT turns 15 years old Getintothis’ Banjo has the line up of its unique and stylish birthday celebrations, including exclusive details on a special aftershow party.

FACT, Liverpool?s very own media arts centre, is due to turn 15 and, like any self-respecting 15 year old, it wants to have a birthday blow out.

FACT?s birthday party is set to run from April 11 to April 15 and promises to celebrate ?the passions of the building; music, art, performance, film and experimentation? by inviting artists, musicians, filmmakers and performers from Liverpool and internationally.

Taking in interactive performances, film, music and performance, FACT?s identity is writ large over the proceedings. From brain-controlled film to the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, this promises to be a sensory and thought provoking experience as FACT continues to work with exciting artists and filmmakers, with the laudable aim of making art accessible to all.

Highlights of the programme for FACT?s birthday include;

Graham Dunning, Mechanical Techno 11-13 April, Free. Performance 13 April, 6pm

Graham Dunning will be creating a new composition, Mechanical Techno, in collaboration with intergenerational groups from Liverpool. Known for generating electronic music from analogue sounds, Dunning will be given a three day residency in FACT’s foyer Learning Space, with the new piece being performed on Friday 13 April.

Graham Dunning

Graham Dunning

Richard Ramchurn, The Moment 12-14 April, 11am – 6pm, Ropewalks Square, Free.

Richard Ramchurn will preview an intriguingly named ?brain controlled film?. Each viewing will be unique, as the vital signs of audience members will control the film via brain/computer interfaces of some kind.

Vicki Bennett, The Mirror 13 April, 6pm-7.30pm, Screen 2

Vicki Bennett was part of FACT?s opening night, when she conducted an audio/visual performance. She returns 15 years later with a dual screen performance where she will mix film clips with original music to ?reflect the multiple versions of the person we present to the world as individuals?

PeopleLikeUs-TheMirror-1

The Mirror

John McHugh with Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra and Music in Mind, Hidden Voice 13 April, 5-6pm, The Box

John McHugh present Hidden Voice, a new work in collaboration with Music in Mind and Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra that aims to give a voice to those living with dementia in Liverpool. The original piece of music will be performed by the RLPO Mishima Quartet.

Jurassic Park turns 25: a look back at a cinema classic

Smriti Keshari, the bomb 13 April, 3-5pm, Screen 2

the bomb looks at the reality of nuclear weapons, using archival film and animation along with music and text. Smriti Keshari?s film looks at one of the world?s most terrifying inventions. A Q&A discussion with Smriti Keshari will follow the film?s screening.

Kinicho, The Cosmos 11-15 April, 11am-6pm, FACT Foyer, Free

Liverpool based innovators of sound Kinicho challenge perceptions of how we experience aural environments with an experimental pop up. This kinetic, sonic sculpture it uses synthesisers and 3D audio to enable you to create your own soundscape.

cosmos-at-make-do-bend

And to wrap things up Getintothis can reveal exlcusive details of a special aftershow party at 25 Kitchen Street…

Aurora Halal, Robin Fox and Local DJs 13 April, 9pm-3am, 24 Kitchen Street, £7.50 Early Bird, £10 ADV, £12.50 OTD

https://www.skiddle.com/whats-on/Liverpool/24-Kitchen-Street/FACT-at-15—party/13155544/

24 Kitchen Street becomes part of FACT?s birthday week with a set of psychedelic, immersive techno from Aurora Halal. Australian audio visual artist Robin Fox will perform a stunning laser show, synchronising sound and visual electricity in hyper-amplified 3D space, and the night will close with support from local DJ talent Binary + Malchance.

ROBIN FOX RGB LASER SHOW from Robin Fox on Vimeo.

Robin Fox outllines exactly why this will be such a special show:

?I?m really happy to be performing for the FACT birthday celebrations in April. I?ll be presenting my new AV laser work Single Origin which synthesises what has been over a decade of research into what I call mechanical synaesthesia. The laser and sound system that I have developed forges a fundamental connection between the voltage that you see and the voltage that you hear. When you draw a pattern with a laser projector you are displacing the beam with incredible speed on an X and Y axis using positive and negative voltages. This is also a simple description of of electricity is used to move speaker cones to produce sound. By transferring the electricity that makes the image directly into a mixing desk – an audio-visual equivalence is achieved. Sound and light synchronise in a way that makes sense neurologically and somatically. The audience is enveloped in sound and light and often left awestruck by the raw simplicity if this display of synchronised electricity.

I have been working with these relationships for many years now and in Single Origin I wanted to do something special. A huge part of my life is sound composition. In fact sound is my first love. When I started working with these audio visual materials I felt bound to present works (Monochroma, RGB) that were purely constructed from those relationships. This left my compositions for live situations like contemporary dance scores, film scores and the occasional release (Editions Mego, Room 40, Synaesthesia etc) quite separate from my audio-visual works. For a time this made sense to me but more recently I wanted to combine these divided sides of my creative self. As a result the laser projector in Single Origin becomes like an instrument that is part of a wider palette. While I still maintain the purity of what I?m doing with the audio-visual relationship there are now moments in the work where sound can take over.

The title also refers to a development in the technical set up for the work and my approach to colour. My first laser show (Monochroma) used just a single green laser projector the second iteration (RGB) used three laser projectors (one red one green and one blue) separated in space allowing for each pure wavelength to be manipulated separately. Single Origin uses an integrated projector that contains red green and blue laser diodes in one projector. This pulls the focus to a single point of origin but allows for blending of the three colours to create a spectrum of colours including a white beam.

This will be my first performance in Liverpool! Really looking forward to it.?

Robin Fox Laser Show from Robin Fox on Vimeo.

The post FACT plans celebrations for its 15th birthday including special aftershow party appeared first on Getintothis.

Howie Payne, Marvin Powell, Zuzu: Unity Theatre, Liverpool
Category Live reviews, Courtney Barnett, David Crosby, Devandra Bernhart, Ethan Johns, Evan Dando, Evol, GIT Award One to Watch, Howie Payne, Incredible String Band, Joni-Mitchell, Liverpool Unity Theatre, marvin powell, Nick Drake, Noel Gallagher, Oasis, Ryan Adams, Ryley Walker, Skeleton Key, The Coral, The Stands, The Unity Theatre, Unity Theatre, Virgin records, zuzu
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With a trio of exceptional songwriters on offer at the Unity Theatre, Getintothis’ Jamie Bowman is put under by their charms.   Hope Place is one of Liverpool’s prettiest streets. Full of the kind of Georgian houses that inspire BBC history programmes it’s also home to the Unity Theatre a converted former synagogue that’s undoubtedly one of the [...]

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Howie Payne

Howie Payne

With a trio of exceptional songwriters on offer at the Unity Theatre, Getintothis’ Jamie Bowman is put under by their charms.  

Hope Place is one of Liverpool’s prettiest streets. Full of the kind of Georgian houses that inspire BBC history programmes it’s also home to the Unity Theatre a converted former synagogue that’s undoubtedly one of the city’s hidden gems and a new and much-needed venue for live music.

Talking of hidden gems, there’s an undoubted feel about tonight’s gig in the Unity‘s perfectly intimate surroundings that we’re being treated to three of Liverpool’s brightest but perhaps not quite appreciated enough talents

First up on an excellent bill is Zuzu – newly signed to Virgin Records on the back of her GIT Award One to Watch and coming across very much as a star in the making. Armed with just a twangy electric guitar rather than her three piece band, Zuzu fills the stage with her confessional songs full of quirky observations from sad granddads to drug-addled boyfriends.

It’s hardly a surprise that she’s already supported Courtney Barnett as there’s undeniable similarities between their styles with her languid, slacker guitar sound frequently exploding into the type of huge choruses Evan Dando used to write. She’s funny too with her Scouse twang cutting through the solemnity of the Unity‘s surroundings with a charm that’s as infectious as her songs.

With his long, lank hair and ‘relaxed’ demeanour, singer-songwriter Marvin Powell looks like he’s stepped straight off the veranda at Big Pink ready for a date with Joni Mitchell and a jamming session with David Crosby.
Thankfully his songs match the look and what follows is a masterclass in acoustic finger picking with Powell, who is signed to The Coral‘s Skeleton Key Records, expertly flitting between the Nu Americana and folk styles of Ryan Adams, Devandra Bernhart and Ryley Walker and the more English folk tradition of Nick Drake as exemplified by Powell‘s breathy and enunciated delivery.
Songs like Bees and Honey glisten and shine when Powell is joined by a guest 12-string guitarist with the psychedelic drone of Buried also recalling the likes of the Incredible String Band and the quasi-mysticism of Led Zeppelin III.
Regarded by many as something of a local hero round these parts, former frontman with The Stands, Howie Payne is currently at the centre of a flurry of activity after far too long away from the action.
New album, Mountain, Payne‘s first since his 2009 Ethan Johns produced debut Bright Light Ballads was released at the tail end of last year with the Scouse songwriter also fashioning an alternative acoustic version and finding the time to curate a box set dedicated to his former band’s output. All this is fine news for his fans tonight who are treated to stunning and intimate set featuring songs from across Payne‘s career featuring little more than a harmonica and the songwriter’s gently picked acoustic.
Stands songs like When The Night Falls In and I Need You evoke a pleasing Proustian rush of nostalgia but what’s remarkable is just how fine Payne‘s songwriting has remained in the 15 years since his band became the apple of Noel Gallagher‘s eye.
The Brightest Star sounds like it should have been ruling the airwaves for years while Some Believer, Sweet Dreamer could be the best song Oasis never released with it’s pleas not to give up and hold on crying out for a stadium sing-a-long.
The timbre of Payne‘s voice seems to have risen since his last release as shown in breathtaking fashion by Quick as the Moon and the cosmic country of Evangeline and each song is rapturously received by an audience knowing they’re watching a man at ease with the fact he’s in the songwriting form of his life and happy to share the fact.
A beautiful All Years Leaving closes proceedings with the title track of The Stands debut shaved bare of its baggage and allowed to stand on its own in spellbinding fashion. Much like its creator it shines on a night when the singer and the song triumphed.
Images by Getintothis’ Tomas Adam
Howie Payne Howie Payne Howie Payne Howie Payne Marvin Powell Marvin Powell Marvin Powell Zuzu Zuzu Zuzu

The post Howie Payne, Marvin Powell, Zuzu: Unity Theatre, Liverpool appeared first on Getintothis.

Half Man Half Biscuit ? top five wacky funster facts
Category Featured Article, All I Want For Christmas is a Dukla Prague Away Kit, Attempted Moustache, BBC Radio 5, Campaign for Real Ale, CAMRA Man, Cherry Red, Damian Green, Faithlift, Half Man Half Biscuit, Johnny Marr, Jools Holland, Latitude, Norman Cook, Old Grey Whistle Test, Revolutionary Spirit: The Sound of Liverpool 1976 ? 1988, simon Blackwell, Some Call it Godcore, Superman, The Smiths, The Trumpton Riots, the tube, Tranmere Rovers, Voyage To The Bottom of the Road
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As Birkenhead faves Half Man Half Biscuit prepare to play Liverpool in September, Getintothis’ Cath Bore enjoys some of the band’s quirkier moments. The notorious Half Man Half Biscuit are from Birkenhead, Wirral, and proud of it. Formed in the early 1980s, they quickly became popular, legendary Auntie Beeb gatekeeper John Peel giving them the [...]

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Half Man Half Biscuit

Half Man Half Biscuit

As Birkenhead faves Half Man Half Biscuit prepare to play Liverpool in September, Getintothis’ Cath Bore enjoys some of the band’s quirkier moments.

The notorious Half Man Half Biscuit are from Birkenhead, Wirral, and proud of it.

Formed in the early 1980s, they quickly became popular, legendary Auntie Beeb gatekeeper John Peel giving them the enthusiastic nod, enchanted and charmed as he was by their satirical, sardonic and often surreal songs.

The group currently consists of songwriter, lead singer and guitarist Nigel Blackwell, bassist Neil Crossley and Carl Henry on drums.

They have released thirteen studio albums in all via Liverpool label Probe Plus; in addition there?s compilations ACD and And Some Fell On Stony Ground to enjoy, plus an array of and EPs and singles.

The four lads who shook the Wirral recorded twelve sessions for John Peel?s radio programme in all, and when they got back together in 1990 after taking a four year long sabbatical, it was on Peel?s show that they made the grand announcement.

Last week came the glorious news that this coming autumn, Half Man Half Biscuit are to play their first Liverpool gig in thirteen years.

It seems fitting to us at Getintothis to look back at some of the band?s fun moments to keep us out of trouble until the great event.

1. Knocking back an appearance on The Tube TV show to go and watch Tranmere Rovers

In 1986, Nigel Blackwell and the rest of Half Man Half Biscuit saw no conflict nor debate when they discovered an offer of an appearance on popular Friday night Channel 4 live music telly show coincided with their beloved Tranmere Rovers playing a football match. So of course they ditched the opportunity which would?ve given the band exposure to millions, and supported their fave team instead.

Or it could be that the band didn?t want to play The Tube in the first place, and used the beautiful game as an excuse. Either way, we must remember, although the programme’s co-presenter Jools Holland wasn?t yet threatening bands with boogie woogie piano in the 1980s the signs, we suspect, were always there.

The boys have appeared on other telly shows, including The Old Grey Whistle Test.

2. Attempted Moustache

Nigel?s brother, and former member Simon Blackwell was in an ensemble called Attempted Moustache, whose song Superman appears on the newly released Cherry Red five CD compilation of Merseyside man bands, Revolutionary Spirit: The Sound of Liverpool 1976 ? 1988.

Half Man Half Biscuit aren?t on the album themselves. Controversial stuff.

3. The great Christianity controversy of 1995

The band ran into trouble when their fifth album Some Call It Godcore hit the shops. Christian Evangelists became distressed because the album art incorporated the fish symbol.

Faithlift from Some Call It Godcore can’t have helped matters, not with the lines  ‘I got me a faithlift, and now I’m bubbling within‘.

Things calmed down after a bit – thank God!

Needless to say, none of the band were ?born again? or have been since. To our knowledge.

4. CAMRA Man

By the time Voyage To The Bottom of the Road album came out two years later, many of the original Half Man Half Biscuit fans had grown up, got proper jobs, maybe married or had kids. These events carry habits and lifestyles along with them, and we?re not being controversial here by saying the boys have a predominantly male following, many of whom by this point had also got into real ale in a big way.

Therefore, the song CAMRA Man, a pun-filled ode to the Campaign for Real Ale, wasn?t always taken entirely in the light hearted spirit it was presumably meant; some fans took CAMRA very seriously and were a trifle upset by the subject matter.

But by now they are, presumably, over it.

5. Damian Green is a fan.

As if pissing off Norman Cook by using his Pizzaman song Happiness at conference in 2006 was bad enough, it seems the Conservative Party still continues to have no shame as regards linking with popular music of the day. Senior Tory as was Damian Green rocked up for a BBC Radio 5 interview at the Latitude festival in summer 2017 wearing a vintage 1960s Dukla Prague away kit football shirt.

All because, it transpires, he?s a massive HMHB fan. The shirt is reference of course to the b side of the band?s 1986 debut single, The Trumpton Riots, the infamous All I Want For Christmas is a Dukla Prague Away Kit.

A loop hole in the law says Cook can do sod all about the Tories using his song, Johnny Marr can’t prevent David Cameron from liking The Smiths despite asking nicely in the 2010 General Election campaign, and HMHB can?t stop Tory ministers wearing footy shirts alluding to them either.

But as Damien Green was relieved of his duties as first secretary of state and the Prime Minister’s right hand man in December just gone after admitting lying about vast amounts of porn stashed on his House of Commons computer, we can?t help but think justice has been served, in part at least.

The post Half Man Half Biscuit – top five wacky funster facts appeared first on Getintothis.

Is the greatest hits album dying?
Category News, Cherry Red, Ed Sheeran, Lou Reed, Luis Fonsi, Polydor, Probe, steely dan, The Fall, The Velvet Underground, Universal
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The greatest hits album seems to be heading towards the dustbin of music history as Getintothis’ Rick Leach discovers. Having one of these stuck in your record collection was always a tad embarrassing; something that signposted you as not being a ?real? music fan. The Greatest Hits collection. Something to be if not exactly ashamed [...]

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Luis Fonsi (Credit: Artists Facebook page)

Luis Fonsi (Credit: Artists Facebook page)

The greatest hits album seems to be heading towards the dustbin of music history as Getintothis’ Rick Leach discovers.

Having one of these stuck in your record collection was always a tad embarrassing; something that signposted you as not being a ?real? music fan.

The Greatest Hits collection.

Something to be if not exactly ashamed about, then something to hide away a little bit.

Your friends would run their fingers along the spines of your carefully collated record collection, then furrow their brows somewhat when they?d stumble across, for example, the only Steely Dan album you possessed – the Greatest Hits.

?So you?re not a big Steely Dan fan then?? they?d ask somewhat disdainfully, as if you?d committed some awful trainspottering faux pas. ?You?ve not got Aja or Pretzel Logic or?.? And they?d reel off a long list of albums you?d only half heard of and weren?t really arsed about anyway.

One Steely Dan album was good enough and if it contained all you ever wanted to hear then that was good enough for you.

However, that implied accusation of dilettantism did hurt a tad and you were always careful thereafter to stick such compilations where they wouldn?t easily be seen.

And God help you if you, like this writer had for a very long time, only one Velvet Underground album and that being one in a truly awful sleeve despite having quite a good track listing. It was a mark of someone who only bought records at HMV or Virgin rather than Probe! (I may have actually got it from Boots The Chemists; ironically quite appropriate bearing in mind the subject matter of a lot of Uncle Lou?s ditties.)

That Velvets album

That Velvets album

But as we know the world of music ever changes and something quite odd -and we can suppose, something that would kill off those music snobs- is now happening.

It?s all to do with streaming.

It?s a brave new world out there and what seemed a sure-fire way of coining it in is being overturned as record companies both big and small fight to adjust to a new technological reality.

For what was a way of shipping and selling hundreds of thousands of records in the past seems to be falling by the wayside because in a nutshell, no-one wants to buy a Greatest Hits album any more. Not even half-arsed music fans. The Gravy Train has come to a crashing halt.

We hold up as the prime example one of the biggest hits of last year, the catchy-as-flu Despacito by Luis Fonsi. It topped the charts for weeks in the UK, but oddly no Greatest Hits album followed in its wake.

You could understand it if Fonsi was straight off the blocks with no back catalogue to his name yet he?s got 20 years of a Latin music career behind him. How difficult would it have been to come back form a long Friday lunch session and throw a greatest hits compilation together? Piece of piss really.

In France that?s exactly what happened. Well, maybe not the long Friday lunch/piece of piss scenario, but Fonsi?s album Despacito and My Greatest Hits made the top three over the Channel and has spent more than 30 weeks on the charts.

But the CD?s weren?t released in the UK.

This is the thing.

In the UK, 2017 was the year in which streaming rose to account for more than half of music consumption – 50.4%, to be exact – up from just 36.4% the year before.

Physical albums on CD and vinyl now make up just over one-third of the market, with the rest coming from digital downloads.

Yet in France, streaming’s share of the market has not yet reached that magic tipping point, still only hitting 46%, while physical sales still make up 45% of the market.

So for big record companies, such as Fonsi?s Polydor it still (just) seems to make it worthwhile to put out physical CDs in France that aren?t released over here.

However, the decline of a physical product probably means the end of compilations that span an artist’s career. Easy pickings by record companies for the best and most well-known tunes and the age of the greatest hits albums seems to be over.

And you don?t really need to be that insightful to realise that once an artists catalogue enters a streaming service then why should the record companies even bother mining the vaults to come up with the greatest hits, especially as now the consumers do that themselves? Why should and why would the listening public go out and buy that embarrassing CD when they can compile their own playlist?

But.

There?s always a but, isn?t there?

While the reissue market for the casual listener is dead (yours truly and the Velvets etc), there is always another side to the coin, one that speaks to the dedicated, specialist and well, completeist market.

Multi-disc box sets that are not so much compiled as “curated”, with weighty books attached containing archive photos and a mini-history lesson of the artist’s career. The main thing is context, which is something that streaming services can never provide.

Recent releases by Cherry Red point a way forward.

They?ve recently released two sumptuously packaged CD collections of both the Manchester and Liverpool music scenes of the late 1970?s and early 1980?s. These are not just plain CD?s, single of double albums in cheap jewel cases but something that looks good as well, something that?s more fittingly placed on your bookshelf than hidden away with your CDs.

Revolutionary Spirit-a trip through Liverpool’s music history

The music might be special and difficult to pull together but the packaging looks special as well.

The possible jewel in Cherry Red?s reissue crown at the moment is their massive seven-CD box set featuring the A-side and B-side of every single released by The Fall from 1978 to 2016.

For Cherry Red compiling this collection together involved rounding up tracks released by eight other record companies, including one of the majors, Universal.

And while it would be too much faffing for the majors to do something like this and they probably wouldn?t profit from it financially, for a label like Cherry Red it?s worthwhile as they can break even on 2,000 copies or so.

In this strange new world, it kind of works for everyone. Majors are quite happy to license some old obscure tracks that they?re not overly interested in while they?re searching for the next Ed Sheeran, indie labels such as Cherry Red can still turn a bit of cash out of it and there?s something for the music fans as well.

So the Greatest Hits album has died. Long live the Greatest Hits album. It?s just different.

The post Is the greatest hits album dying? appeared first on Getintothis.

Martin Carr, Satin Beige: Leaf, Liverpool
Category Live reviews, Beatles, Bluetones, Boo Radleys, David Bowie, Giant Steps, LeafSleeper, LIPA, Liverpool, Martin Carr, Michael Krugman, satin beige
Published:
Description:

  As Boo Radley’s mainman Martin Carr returns to the stage, Getintothis’ Jamie Bowman sees a retreat from the spotlight from one of Liverpool’s best songwriters With a name that reeks of stardom, Satin Beige has a lot to live up to as she takes to the stage in the attractive surroundings of Leaf. A [...]

The post Martin Carr, Satin Beige: Leaf, Liverpool appeared first on Getintothis.

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Martin Carr. Photo from artist's Facebook page

Martin Carr. Photo from artist’s Facebook page

As Boo Radley’s mainman Martin Carr returns to the stage, Getintothis’ Jamie Bowman sees a retreat from the spotlight from one of Liverpool’s best songwriters

With a name that reeks of stardom, Satin Beige has a lot to live up to as she takes to the stage in the attractive surroundings of Leaf. A graduate of the LIPA conveyor belt, this Essex-born lass has happily made her home in Liverpool where her acoustic infused R&B combined with velvet vocals and sultry lyrics has brought an intoxicating mix of sensuality and sass to the table during many an uninspiring support slot. Where before she would stand out from the crowd with the use of her cello, tonight she appears upfront and confident behind her guitar with fine tunes like recent single Like You Did Before worthy of the wider audience that should, by right, be hers with any accusations of blandness put to bed by the presence of a pleasing bed of electronic beats and confessional tales.

The contrast between Beige‘s and headliner Martin Carr‘s current situations couldn’t be starker. Where the young songstress appears to be reaching for the stars, Carr appears to be a man who was never that comfortable with fame in the first place. At the height of Britpop he steered his band the Boo Radleys to the top of the charts with the ubiquitous Wake Up Boo! but in the two decades since he’s cut a detached and sometimes troubled figure with his periodic solo releases under the Brave Captain moniker, hinting at a pretty extensive comedown following the highs of the mid-90s.

Steadfastly refusing to join contemporaries like Sleeper, Space and the Bluetones on the nostalgia circuit, Carr shuffles on to the stage as he and collaborator Michael Krugman survey various banks of technology as if they are ancient texts. It’s undeniably a shock to see the curly haired Carr without a guitar around his neck and perhaps a disappointment to a supportive crowd expecting a trip through the Boo’s back catalogue of baroque pop and shoegazey dub.

Pete Wylie Talks ? An evening of spoken word at the British Music Experience

But as the Boos hinted at with their masterpiece Giant Steps, Carr was never a songwriter content with standing still and his latest incarnation (inspired by the death of David Bowie) sees him working with samples, keyboards and the sort of drum beats that sound like they could splutter out at any moment.

Martin Carr. Photo from artist's Facebook page

Martin Carr. Photo from artist’s Facebook page

With the crowd quickly won over, Carr grows in confidence as he wrestles each tune from his machinery and, judging by some of the lyrics, some pretty dark mental places. Paranoid and anxious, we hear references to Brexit and a sample of Nigel Farage at one point and there are frequent allusions to Carr‘s unhappy pop star life (‘I was swimming in the mainstream’). What he can’t shrug off however is that Beatlesesque way with a tune with the McCartney on downers loveliness of A Mess Of Everything a particular highlight.

Pausing to thank Pete Wylie for the loan of his guitar, when Carr does return to the six string we’re truly spoilt with a stunning version of Thinking of Ways (‘Just like always with a head full of beer  I will try and tell someone tonight’) from Giant Steps while a rousing Damocles and a soaring Three Studies of the Male Back look to Carr’s past for inspiration and show a man beginning to grow more comfortable with his achievements as a songwriter.

Troubled and worn he may be but this is one Carr that’s not ready to be written off just yet.

The post Martin Carr, Satin Beige: Leaf, Liverpool appeared first on Getintothis.

Husky Loops, whenyoung, Monks: Sound Basement, Liverpool
Category Live reviews, Husky Loops, Monks, sound, whenyoung
Published:
Description:

Husky Loops have a sound that seems to break the rules and Getintothis? Scarlett India witnessed it all first hand in Sound?s basement. Dream-pop band, Monks, opened the night to a room full of fans and proud family members. The youthful appearance of this band soon demonstrated the talent they have, putting any doubts to [...]

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Husky Loops

Husky Loops

Husky Loops have a sound that seems to break the rules and Getintothis? Scarlett India witnessed it all first hand in Sound?s basement.


Dream-pop band, Monks, opened the night to a room full of fans and proud family members.

The youthful appearance of this band soon demonstrated the talent they have, putting any doubts to bed. Monks? music are a breath of fresh air in indie music, adding trumpet instrumentals to fun guitar riffs.

The band left the audience chanting for more, something they can get in May, when the band plays Sound City.

The second act, whenyoung, came on to a growing crowd.

They played catchy, glam indie-rock songs which were brought together with dreamy vocals. A favourite seemed to be The Others, written for those who lost their lives at the Grenfell Tower tragedy. A catchy song, and a fitting tribute.

whenyoung brought with them an interesting look of blazers and jumpsuits, making sure to stand out from the crowd.

Europe can save us- a magic solution for overpriced gigs and impossible-to-get tickets

The headliners, Husky Loops, were as good as anticipated. Simultaneously unsettling and entertaining, their live show was a spectacle.

Husky Loops? post-punk sound relies heavily on samples and effects, brought together with strong rhythms.
Instead of being lit by colours, this band chose to have one haunting, white light.

They transitioned between songs with few words. Husky Loops are out-there, with big beats and prominent bass lines. They had the crowd gripped from the start, with one audience member shouting out: ‘I fucking love these songs.’

Images by Getintothis’ Lucy McLachlan

Monks Monks Monks Husky Loops Husky Loops Husky Loops Husky Loops Husky Loops Husky Loops Husky Loops Husky Loops Monks

The post Husky Loops, whenyoung, Monks: Sound Basement, Liverpool appeared first on Getintothis.

Jurassic Park turns 25: a look back at a cinema classic
Category Film, Opinion, 25th anniversary, bug's life, Earth, Jeff Goldblum, Jurassic, Jurassic Park, kenner toys, laura dern, pixar, Richard Attenborough, Sam Neil, stan winston, Steven Spielberg, Toy Story, Wind & Fire, world
Published:
Description:

As we celebrate the 25th anniversary of Jurassic Park, Getintothis’ Billy Strickland  looks at the impact it had on a generation of cinema goers.   Sixty five millions years ago dinosaurs ruled the earth. 25 years ago they ruled our cinema screens. It?s the film that made cinema history, defined childhoods, and thrilled audiences in the summer of 1993 [...]

The post Jurassic Park turns 25: a look back at a cinema classic appeared first on Getintothis.

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Jurassic Park

Jurassic Park

As we celebrate the 25th anniversary of Jurassic Park, Getintothis’ Billy Strickland  looks at the impact it had on a generation of cinema goers.  

Sixty five millions years ago dinosaurs ruled the earth. 25 years ago they ruled our cinema screens.

It?s the film that made cinema history, defined childhoods, and thrilled audiences in the summer of 1993 and it?s turning 25 this year.

Based on author Michael Crichton?s bestselling book of the same name, Jurassic Park became a worldwide phenomenon. Everybody and their mother wanted to see this film. Nobody could stop talking about it, and for very good reason. Featuring ground breaking technology and a superb blend of thrills and family entertainment, it truly does ‘continue to capture the imagination of the entire planet.’

Now, when this writer first experienced Jurassic Park, most likely at the innocent age of four or five, he fell in love with something, something so powerful it could change your life.  Yes, dinosaurs where as cool as ever, but seeing them ?alive? in a film changed things.

This now long-time fan fell in love with cinema because of Jurassic Park, and watching the film many times every year for the past 20 years, always finds something to love about it. And it was really at this point in the writer?s childhood that he knew what he wanted to do for the rest of his life.

The film’s plot follows that of the book but is less science-heavy and more watered down for a mainstream audience. Sam Neill plays the hero, Dr Alan Grant, and the most developed roll in the film. He hates kids, which creates something of an inner conflict for him in his personal relationship with Laura Dern?s leaf loving character, paleobotanist Ellie Sattler.

Although finding himself having to look after the two kid stars of the film, Tim and Lex, he learns to appreciate them, and it is this aspect of the film that resonates with me personally. It?s such a powerful, subtle theme that  allows for characters to be layered rather than the one dimensional, gun toting action heroes expected in a summer blockbuster. There is a certain level of humanity that is brought to the film that everyone can relate to.

When Steven Spielberg began rolling on what would be his first day of shooting Jurassic Park, he didn?t know the impact it would have and how much of a classic it would become. But what is it that makes Jurassic Park so special? Actually, many factors come into play when talking about what makes this the best dinosaur film ever made. It isn?t a shame to think that even with three sequels the first has never been topped.

Jurassic Park certainly wrestles with multiple themes; you?ve got parenthood and family, greed, technology, power, but all of this comes down to the age old theme of good versus evil, or in the film’s context, man versus nature. One could argue this is portrayed through the characters of mathematician Ian Malcolm, played so naturally by the eccentric Jeff Goldblum, and John Hammond, played by the legendary Richard Attenborough.

Of course this writer at an early age (pre A-Level film studies) didn?t realise the clever mis-en-scene at work here. Goldblum?s character being the ?nature? side of things wears all black, representing the opposition to good. His character disagrees with everything going on at the dinosaur amusement park, compared to his opposition. John Hammond, dressed from head to toe in white believing all his intentions are good. In one of the film’s greatest dialogue exchanges, characters Alan Grant, Ellie Sattler, Ian Malcom, and John Hammond observe what happens behind the scenes of the amusement park, and discover the immense power and control needed to run an operation of such scale. They also witness the birth of an infant velociraptor.

Ian Malcolm, far from impressed, is too concerned with the high probability that everything he is seeing is going to fail, saying ‘the kind of power you?re attempting here, it?s not possible’. This leads to one of the most potent lines in the film: ‘Life breaks free, it expands to new territories, it crashes through barriers.  Painfully, even dangerously’ and then continues on to say ‘Life finds a way’.

It?s this line, delivered exceptionally by the actor that brings argument to Jurassic Park. Just because dinosaurs can be made, should they? It?s a feasible debate to go along with a feasible idea that as technology in the real world advances at an alarming rate, it could bring us to this reality one day.

trex use

Jurassic Park. Photo from the Jurassic Worlds Facebook Page

It?s the early 1990?s. Audiences have grown accustomed to the special effects that are filling their summer blockbusters like a wild plague. They?ve seen space battles in Star Wars and they?ve seen light cycles in Tron, it is becoming normality. In 1991, James Cameron releases Terminator 2: Judgment Day featuring the terrifying T1000. Now the T1000 is the latest and best in computer generated imagery from Industrial Light and Magic (ILM), the special effects maestros of Hollywood. It raised the bar in the field of CGI, but as amazing as it was, people just weren?t expecting was about to happen two years later.

Enter June 1993. Jurassic Park lit up theatres everywhere, and like the asteroid that destroyed the films flagship characters, it blew the planet away. It changed film forever.

Audiences had never before witnessed anything like this. Even other renowned directors wanted to jump on the band wagon, George Lucas being one of them! The success of the CGI in Jurassic is what inspired him to start his Star Wars prequels. As a matter of fact (and more than likely a little known fact), it was George Lucas who oversaw the post production stage of the film whilst Spielberg had to dash off to film one of his other classics, Schindler’s List. Bet you didn?t know that one.

Wes Anderson- five of the best from the director of The Grand Budapest Hotel

Arguably the most iconic sequence in the film (and possibly in any film ever) is the superbly executed T-Rex escape scene. Now, a full CGI model of the tyrannosaur appears in this scene, but clever use of low light and rain allows for the animal to appear to be a living breathing creature, a technique directors seem to forget nowadays in cinema. In Jurassic World (2015), the CGI looks as though it belongs in 1993 more than its predecessor does. The truth is that Spielberg opts to use as little CGI as possible, maybe because the technology was just starting out and he didn?t want to seem to ambitious.  But intentional or not, the lack of CGI being used, along with a perfect blend of animatronics from the masterful Stan Winston is what allows it to shine today ahead some of cinemas modern releases, such as Jurassic World.

Spielberg was already established as a filmmaker who could thrill his audience, and Jurassic Park is a masterclass in suspense filmmaking.  But this film was about dinosaurs, and who doesn’t love dinosaurs? That?s right; ultimately Jurassic Park was a film for kids. But this director was not going to shy away from the scariness the film needed. No, instead he masterfully blends family adventure with suspense and science fiction horror.

In many ways the film is just like one of Spielberg?s other films, Jaws. Just like in the 1975 shark classic, he manages to portray the humanity of his characters in such a real and charming way, so when it comes to the bad things happening, you really start to care for the people on screen. Jurassic Park has such a warm innocence to it in earlier scenes that kids in the audience are eased into the terror starting to unfold.

For example, the brachiosaurus scene, the first time a full CGI dinosaur is seen in the film, (and what a magical moment it is). With this scene younger members of the audience are seeing what Spielberg intended; an animal. It?s this approach that allows for children to not be scared of the colossal lizards, but rather to be fascinated. Even when the dinos are attacking, kids still watch in awe.  Following the release of the film, there was a significant increase in students choosing to study palaeontology.

It?s even the little things in Jurassic Park that leave a mark. Little elements the filmmakers struggled to accomplish at the time, such as the cup of water rippling on the dashboard of the land explorer with each step the ferocious tyrannosaur took. Mentioned earlier, this caused special effects wizard Michael Lantieri many sleepless nights trying to figure out just how he would accomplish this, and Spielberg was adamant after being inspired by simply Earth, Wind & Fire in his car at full volume.

In the end it was an amplified guitar string plucked at the right note that brought it to life.  Yes it built the suspense of the unknown, but also for many years to come directors would copy the gag in their films. Even as recent as 2018 the gag is still being put to good use like some old working dog, with Star Wars: The Last Jedi (Rian Johnson) featuring a close up shot of a drinking rippling in an casino on some far off planet.

Even the unique sound of the T-Rex created for this film (made by slowing down the sound of a baby elephant) can be noticed in films such as Toy Story 3 and a Bugs Life, which makes me think Pixar have a thing for this film.

In the interest of the film’s target audience, Kenner Toys were the company in charge of the inevitable toy line to coincide with the release of the film. And of course, kids of 1993 went crazy. Featuring all the main dinosaurs from the film, vehicle play sets and main characters, it allowed for the adventure to be continued in the imaginations of a six year olds bedroom. These figures are still sought after today by the hardcore fans and, of course, some are more sought after than others.  But this is just another part of the legacy Jurassic Park has left.

It is safe to say that the impact Jurassic Park has left is a powerful one. Cinema was about to enter a new age, there was no going back for audiences, as now they would always want bigger and better. For many people the film holds a special place in their hearts. Whether it?s simply because it?s the first film they ever saw, or it inspired them to grow up and become filmmakers or palaeontologists. Jurassic Park will forever be the film that changed not just cinema, but people?s lives.

And that?s the true power of cinema.

The post Jurassic Park turns 25: a look back at a cinema classic appeared first on Getintothis.


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